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Making the Most of Your Annual OB-GYN Appointment

Monday, April 21st, 2014

Too often, women have a list of questions or concerns in their heads in the days leading up to an appointment with their doctors, only to forget most or all of them once in the exam room. Or, they leave the doctor’s office without feeling they received all of the information they needed. You don’t get a lot of time with your gynecologist, so it’s a good idea to be aware of some strategies for making sure you get as much as you can out of the visit. Here are some tips for making sure you and your doctor communicate well and that you get what you need out of your visit.

1. Know when your last period was. Mark it on a calendar and know the date – your gynecologist needs to know this. If you are experiencing irregular bleeding, a calendar tracking your periods as far back as possible is preferable.

2. For a couple of days before your visit, do not douche (which you should not be doing anyway) or have sex. Both of these things can interfere with the results of your pap test.

3. Bring a written list of all medications you are taking, including herbal supplements and vitamins. Know the doses and names of all of them.

4. Bring a list that you have prepared ahead of time of all questions you want to ask or concerns you want to bring up. Even if there are only a few items on the list, write them down – it’s too easy to forget them during the visit.

5. Ask for clarification. If the doctor says something you don’t fully understand, speak up. If you aren’t sure, repeat it back to the doctor in your own words to make sure you get it. Also ask if he or she can recommend any books or other resources for information on any condition you may have.

6. Be completely honest. Never lie about drug or alcohol use, your sexual history, or any other issues your doctor asks about, no matter how embarrassing the conversation may feel. Not being truthful can lead to a wrong diagnosis or the wrong advice.

7. If you need to discuss a specific problem you are having, take some time to make some notes before your appointment and know the answers to questions such as: When did the problem begin? What have you tried to improve your symptoms? What worked and what didn’t? Has any other doctor seen you for the condition; have any tests been done? What were the results? What makes the problem worse and what alleviates it? Include any information you can think of that might be relevant.

Most women don’t look forward to their annual gynecologic checkup, but it is one of the most important things you will do all year. Following these tips for making the most of your visit can ensure you get the highest quality care possible.

– Yvonne S. Thornton, M. D., M. P. H