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What Is Endometrial Ablation?

Monday, March 31st, 2014

Endometrial ablation is a procedure in which a layer of the uterine lining is permanently removed in order to reduce or stop abnormal bleeding. The procedure is performed only on women who do not wish to have any more children. In some cases, it is performed in place of a hysterectomy.

The techniques used to perform endometrial ablation vary and include electrocautery, radiofrequency, cryoablation, and hydrothermal procedures, among others. The procedure is performed on women who are experiencing abnormal bleeding (bleeding between periods) or menorrhagia (prolonged or extremely heavy periods). Abnormal bleeding can be so severe in some cases that daily life is interrupted and some women may even develop anemia.

Reasons for abnormal bleeding and menorrhagia include hormone disorders or imbalances, fibroid tumors, polyps, or endometrial cancer. However, as stated earlier, the lining of the uterus is destroyed during ablation and is no longer able to function normally; therefore, bleeding is significantly lessened or even stopped entirely, and it is important to know that the woman also will no longer be able to become pregnant.

Endometrial ablation carries the same risks as any surgical procedure, including infection, bleeding, perforation of the uterine wall, or complications due to medication sensitivities the patient is not aware of (or neglects to inform the doctor of). In addition, women with certain medical conditions should not have this procedure, and these include vaginal infections, cervical infections, pelvic inflammatory disease, weakness of the uterine muscle, abnormal shape or structure of the uterus, and having an IUD in place, among others. In my health book, “Inside Information for Women”, I discuss this technique under “Resectoscopy”.  Endometrial ablation with cautery via a resectoscope or any other modality is a little tricky if the patient ultimately is found to have uterine cancer.  Why?  Because all the evidence regarding the extent of the disease (cancer) is burned away and the physician will have difficulty in staging the cancer, which is important in formulating the best management for a patient with uterine cancer. 

If your doctor and you decide that endometrial ablation may be right for you, your doctor should explain the procedure to you thoroughly and give you a chance to ask any questions you have. If you are to have a procedure that requires general anesthesia, you will be asked not to eat or drink before the procedure, most likely for at least eight hours or after midnight the night before. Be sure to tell your doctor if you may be pregnant, are allergic to any medications, or are taking any prescription drugs or herbal supplements.

Your procedure may take place in a hospital or in your doctor’s office on an outpatient basis. Recovery will depend on the type of anesthesia and the type of ablation used. In general, you can expect to need to wear a sanitary pad for a few days after the procedure, as bleeding during this time is normal. Also for the first few days, you may experience cramping, frequent urination, nausea, and/or vomiting.

Your doctor will probably instruct you not to use tampons, douche, or have sex for at least a few days. Usually restrictions on other activities are also necessary, such as heavy lifting and strenuous exercise. Let your doctor know if you experience fever, chills, severe pain, difficulty urinating, excessive bleeding, or foul-smelling discharge.

This information applies in general to most ablation procedures, but because each woman and situation is unique, the most important thing to remember is to follow your doctor’s specific instructions, and ask any questions you may have.

– Yvonne S. Thornton, M. D., M. P. H.